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  • Inability to lose weight and maintain it
  • Belly fat, or fat localized in one area that you can’t get rid of …  (no matter how hard you try!)
  • Digestive changes (constipation, gas, bloating, etc)
  • Cravings or energy crashes
  • Poor sleep
  • Hormone changes
  • Anxiety and depression

 We are offering this seminar on 2 dates:
Tues 1/7 at 6PM and Sat 1/11 at 10AM.

This robust 1 hour, complementary seminar will examine the deeper levels of weight loss that are key to getting the body in a fat burning mode, instead of a fat storing mode.  We will examine: Register Here

— Why mainstream diets dont work for long term weight loss/ maintenance

— The importance of sleep and digestion

— The liver as a key component to successful weight loss

— What’s the right exercise for my body

— Hormone balance (for men too!)

Pre-registration is required by calling 303-466-3232 or Register Here

Bring your friend, and receive a coupon for a 1 hour Detoxifying, Inch Loss Body Wrap ($95 value.  Must mention the Facebook post.  Pre registration is required for both the guest and their friend)

Healthy eating is not about depriving yourself from the food you love or maintaining a slim figure. It’s about staying as healthy as possible and feeling great about it. Fortunately, this could all be attained by sticking to some nutritional basics and applying them to your daily diet.

In this article, we’ll help you plan and create healthy and tasty meals and expand your range of healthy and delectable food choices. Read on and enjoy the perks of sticking to a healthier eating habit.

Simplify

Instead of obsessing yourselves over calorie counts and measuring food sizes, think of your diet in terms of freshness, variety and color. By doing this, it would be easier for you choose a variety of healthy foods without the complications of counting calories and serving sizes. Focus on the foods you love, create easy recipes and incorporate fresh ingredients.

Make gradual changes

Shifting to a healthier diet cannot be done overnight. That’s not realistic either. Also, a person who tries to change everything at once tends to cheat or easily give up on their new diet plan.

Take small steps such as adding a vegetable or fruit to your diet once in a while. Also, when cooking, you could switch from butter to olive oil. As you start to adapt to these changes, feel free to add in more healthy foods into your diet.

Incorporate exercise and water in your diet

Water helps flush out toxins and waste products in our system. With the lack of water in our body, this could result to dehydration; thus, causing headache, lack of energy and tiredness. Staying hydrated is important.

Most people mistake thirst for hunger. Drink a glass of water to know if you are really hunger or you’re just thirsty. This could also be helpful for people who are on a diet.

Find an activity that you enjoy and add it to your daily routine, just like adding in a few fruits and vegetables in your diet every day. Exercise comes with a long list of benefits. And you can get all these by staying active and spending a few minutes a day exercising.

By adhering to a regular exercise program, plus, incorporating a few servings of healthy foods, you are on your way to a healthier lifestyle.

Hard to ignore all those tempting sweets during the holidays? Do you dread the holidays with all those tempting, fattening foods? This year, be prepared for the season with these tips from WebMD.com

1. Exercise, exercise, exercise

“Setting a regular fitness schedule is the key to keeping weight off in winter,” says Lisa Giannetto, MD, an assistant clinical professor in the Diet and Fitness Center at the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C. “Come five o’clock, when it’s pitch black and cold out, you’re a lot more likely to go to your warm home and watch TV if you don’t have a regular fitness schedule that includes a variety of types of exercises.”

2. Never go to a party hungry

“Fruits and vegetables are where we need to get our carbohydrates, and not from alcohol and brownies,” says Jule Anne Henstenberg, RD, director of the nutrition program at La Salle University. “Use high-fiber fruits and vegetables to fill up before a party.” Eat a bunch of baby carrots, a big salad, or an apple, for example, to curb your desire for empty party-food calories.

“When we eat outside the home, studies suggest that we may take in 40% more calories than we would otherwise,” says Cheskin. “We even have seen this finding replicated in animal models.”

So much of our eating is not related to hunger, he says. The more variety of foods available at a meal, the more likely you are to eat more food.

“The stress of a social setting and an environment with many food choices and alcohol will tend to foster overeating,” Cheskin says. “So these are good times to be on guard.”

3. Avoid alcohol

Alcohol is loaded with calories. And since “many holiday celebrations involve drinking, it’s easy to take in a lot of calories without being aware that you are,” says Scott Isaacs, MD, clinical instructor of medicine at Emory University and medical director at Intelligent Health Center. “Drink a glass of water or a diet soda before and after each alcoholic beverage to help pace yourself and to dilute calories,” says Isaacs, who is also the author of Hormonal Balance: Understanding Hormones, Weight and Your Metabolism.

4. Practice calorie damage control

“If you do overeat, don’t ‘fall off the wagon.'” says Isaacs. “Make up for it by cutting your calories for a few days and adding extra exercise.”

And get exercise in anywhere you can, says Giannetto. Take a brisk walk on your lunch break and after dinner. At work, use stairs rather than the elevator.

“When you get just 100 fewer calories per day through dieting and exercise or both, that is the equivalent of 10 pounds per year.”

5. Remember to have fun

“The main reason you’re at a party is to see people and celebrate, not to eat a lot of high-calorie foods,” says Cheskin. “So be aware of why you’re there and make that your focus.”

 

Thanksgiving Day involves a lot of delicious and lovingly cooked food. It also offers a lot of temptation to gorge yourself until you feel sick. Balancing the desire to eat as much of the tasty fare as possible with being sensitive to your limits is a case of mindful eating. Here are some suggestions to help you out.

Accept that this is a day of indulgence. While you may be on a diet or watching your food intake, bringing any sense of deprivation into the day may cause you to overeat out of sheer rebelliousness against “missing out”. Cut yourself a little slack and let yourself enjoy more food than usual on this special day. After all, the next day things can go back to normal.

Be sure to eat properly prior to the meal. Don’t skip any of the meals during the day – eat breakfast and lunch. The only difference is that you may want to eat more lightly than usual. However, skipping eating normally will just tempt you to overeat at the Thanksgiving meal.

Take small amounts when serving yourself. Take one small piece or scoop of everything that you enjoy to begin with. Remind yourself that you can always take seconds! This approach is considerate of the need to avoid waste.

Honor the food. Thanksgiving is a time of giving thanks for the food that is on the table. Think about the contents of your plate and how it was once alive and is now about to provide you with energy and nutrition. Think about all the people whose efforts brought the food to the table, from the farmer to the cook.

Pause. Before you begin to eat, notice everything about the food on your plate. What are its colors, textures, aromas and anything else of note?

Take small bites and chew everything well. This relates back to the previous step––as you bite, savor the things that you noticed about the food when you took time to assess, such as texture and taste. Also, small bites and slow chewing aids digestion, as enzymes in the mouth begin to break down the food for you.

Chat with others. You’re more likely to realize that you’re full before you feel sick if you talk, rather than shovel food into your mouth non-stop! During the meal, make an effort to engage others in conversation in between bites. This shouldn’t be too hard if family members you haven’t seen for awhile turn up with news of the events in their lives.

Avoid wolfing down your food. Eat slowly and savor the food you’re consuming. If you finish everything on your plate, wait a minute. You can tell a story to everyone else, or just sit back and relax.

Take seconds only if you’re still hungry. Repeat the eat-wait-take more cycle until you feel satisfied, but not stuffed. Aim for feeling good, not feeling so stuffed that you can’t eat another thing or feel ill.

Get away from the table. Go for a walk, play football, entertain a child, play with a pet or help clean up! Head out to volunteer for those less fortunate on Thanksgiving. This will keep you from munching just because there’s food in sight.

Congratulate yourself on a job well done. And laugh at everyone who feels so full they can’t move! In fact, you might take a moment to share the secret of enjoying a Thanksgiving meal mindfully with them––just don’t be preachy.

http://www.wikihow.com/Avoid-Overeating-on-Thanksgiving

1 cup serving:

11 g protein
114 mg sodium
4 g fat
143 calories
Traditional “Cream of Mushroom Soup/Fried Onion” Green Bean Casserole:
3/4 cup serving:
3 g protein
530 mg sodium
9 g fat
161 calories
Aunt Frannie’s “Healthy Twist” on Green Bean Casserole, Amy Richardson, CNT: (Download pdf. here)
1/2 onion, sliced
4 cups fresh green beans
1 3/4 cups plain greek yogurt
1/4 cup fresh grated parmesan cheese (plus 1 TBS for garnish)
1/4 cup panko style bread crumbs (plus 2 TBS for garnish)
2 TBS olive oil
dashes nutmeg if desired
dashes sea salt
dashes crushed red pepper
Nutritious and Delicious Green Bean CasseroleNutritious and Delicious Green Bean CasseroleNutritious and Delicious Green Bean CasseroleNutritious and Delicious Green Bean Casserole

 

 

 

 

 

 

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Heat skillet to medium high with 2 TBS olive oil
Add sliced onions and saute until soft. Add green beans and blanche/saute until slightly cooked.
Add spices.
In mixing bowl: mix hot green bean and onion mixture with yogurt. Add parm and panko. Mix thoroughly and pour and spread into 8×8 square baking dish. Top with remaining TBS of panko and parm.  Bake @ 350 for 25 min. on middle rack until bubbly and browning. Brown an extra 2 minutes on top rack on “broil” setting but careful not to burn.
*Note: add sliced mushrooms to skillet if desired.
*Note: double or triple if serving more than 5-6 people.
This recipe packs more protein, less sodium, and less fat. It’s nutrient dense and doesn’t have artificial fillers, and is easier to digest than traditional casseroles.

The next time you look in a mirror, think about this: In many ways you’re more microbe than human. There are 10 times more cells from microorganisms like bacteria and fungi in and on our bodies than there are human cells.

Scientists increasingly think that these microorganisms have a huge influence on our health. Without them, our bodies don’t seem to do as well. We don’t seem to be as healthy and might actually get sick more often.

But these tiny compatriots are invisible to the naked eye. So we asked artist Ben Arthur to give us a guided tour. Join me as we dive into the rich universe of the human microbiome.

(Source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/11/01/242361826/exploring-the-invisible-universe-that-lives-on-us-and-in-us)

Grapeseed oil, a by-product of the wine-making process, comes from extracting the oil from within the small, hard-shelled seed. A stable cooking oil, grapeseed oil does not smoke or splatter. This oil features a high smoke point, or temperature at which oil smokes and discolors, ranging from approximately 320 to 428 degrees, depending on the brand. The light, buttery or nutty flavor leaves no aftertaste and enhances a food’s natural flavor. Grapeseed oil is an economical cooking oil because only one-third to one-half cup of grapeseed oil equals one cup of other oils.

Instructions

Frying, Roasting and Barbecuing

1 Use a paper towel to remove moisture from surface of raw meats. This dry surface will aid in browning the meat.

2 Marinate or brush meat with grapeseed oil or flavored varieties such as garlic or walnut. Grapeseed oil works well with meat, poultry or fish. This thin layer of oil will help retain flavor and prevent sticking to the frying pan, roasting pan or grill.

3 Place meat in pre-heated frying pan, oven or grill. If meat starts to look dry, brush on another thin layer of grapeseed oil.

Grapeseed Oil as a Butter Substitute

4 Substitute grapeseed oil for butter by brushing on a sliced piece of bread. Add optional grated cheese, sliced tomatoes, chopped olives or other toppings.

5 Place topped bread on a shallow metal baking pan under a pre-heated broiler until cheese is melted or toppings are browned.

6 Remove bread carefully from oven. Add freshly ground pepper if desired.

Grapeseed Oil as a Condiment

7 Mix grapeseed oil or varieties infused with herbs and spices as part of a mayonnaise or salad dressing recipe. Test with small amounts of grapeseed oil and increase the amounts to balance with other ingredients in the adapted recipe.

8 Add grapeseed oil to raw or cooked vegetables, salads and pasta. This light-tasting oil will not overpower food.

9 Use grapeseed oil as part of a dip for fresh vegetables on a platter.

Read more: http://www.ehow.com/how_7463732_cook-grapeseed-oil.html#ixzz2iSllh2Wr

Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Crispy Capers and Carrots

Prep: 15 minutes; Cook: 18 minutes. People typically turn up their noses at Brussels sprouts. But carrots, capers, and parsley take these to another level, flavorwise.

Yield: Makes about 12 servings (serving size: 1/2 cup)

Ingredients

2 pounds Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
1 1/2 cups (1/4-inch) diagonally cut carrots
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided
Cooking spray
1 tablespoon butter
1/2 cup well-drained capers
1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 450º.

2. Combine Brussels sprouts, carrots, and 3 tablespoons oil in a medium bowl, tossing to coat. Spread on large roasting pan coated with cooking spray. Bake at 450° for 15 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally.

3. Heat remaining 1 tablespoon oil and butter in a small skillet over medium heat. Add capers; fry 3 minutes or until brown and crisp. With slotted spoon, transfer capers to paper towels to drain. Set aside.

4. Combine Brussels sprout mixture and capers in medium bowl. Sprinkle with parsley, salt, and pepper; toss gently to mix.

Here is a great and easy way to make sweet potato pancakes this is a healthy breakfast, lunch, or snack. Enjoy! See all of my videos at http://livingwell-nutrition.com/certified-nutrition/nutrition-videos/

The weather is getting cooler, but your produce choices are heating up.

These amazing superfoods are either hitting their peak in the garden or can easily be found in your local farmers market or grocery store.

They’re the perfect excuse to get cooking on cool nights!

For more videos visit http://livingwell-nutrition.com/certified-nutrition/nutrition-videos/