How is your family’s well-being measuring up?
Will 2014 be different?
Healthier Families = Happier Families

Healthy Holiday Eating: Battling the Bulge
TUESDAY, November 19th, 1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Join Amy Richardson, CNT give you recipes and tips on how to fight those
tempting treats this holiday season.

Fight that Flu, Cold, What-Have-You: (An Immune-Boosting Seminar)
WEDNESDAY, November 13th, NOON – 1:00 p.m.
OR
TUESDAY, November 19th, 5:00 – 6:00 p.m.

Amy will discuss various topics on staying well and fighting the bugs this
season. She’ll include not only immune-boosting preventative measures, but
provide tips if you do get sick to speed up your recovery.

Holiday OPEN HOUSE: Everyone welcome!
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3rd, 1:00-4:00 p.m.

Join us for healthy, festive food as well as giveaways/prizes. We’ll have some
great gift-buying opportunities too!

New Year, New YOU: Lose that Weight and Keep it Off 2014
TUESDAY, JANUARY 7th, 6:00-7:00

Join us at our free Weight Loss seminar where you’ll learn how to
engage your fat burning hormones. Seminar is free, and afterward
you’ll have the opportunity to sign up for a customized weight loss
program and/or detoxification program at a huge savings.

Sign up for seminars at front desk or online at www.BurnFatBroomfield.com.

The next time you look in a mirror, think about this: In many ways you’re more microbe than human. There are 10 times more cells from microorganisms like bacteria and fungi in and on our bodies than there are human cells.

Scientists increasingly think that these microorganisms have a huge influence on our health. Without them, our bodies don’t seem to do as well. We don’t seem to be as healthy and might actually get sick more often.

But these tiny compatriots are invisible to the naked eye. So we asked artist Ben Arthur to give us a guided tour. Join me as we dive into the rich universe of the human microbiome.

(Source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/11/01/242361826/exploring-the-invisible-universe-that-lives-on-us-and-in-us)

Pumpkin Pie with Rum
Looking for a healthy alternative to fatty Thanksgiving recipes without sacrificing taste? Try this Pumpkin pie recipe- Dark molasses and dark rum put this pumpkin pie a cut above the rest. Nonfat evaporated milk, which stands in for heavy cream, does a fantastic job of cutting the fat in the filling. Add to that our blue ribbon butter-canola crust and you’ve dropped three-quarters of the fat and more than half the calories found in most similar pies. Don’t use pumpkin-pie mix—buy canned pumpkin without added spices: the flavor will be superior.

Makes: 8 servings

Active Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour 10 minutes

CRUST
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup whole-wheat flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon butter
3 tablespoons canola oil
1-2 tablespoons ice water

FILLING
2 large eggs
1 15- or 16-ounce can plain pumpkin puree
1 12-ounce can nonfat evaporated milk
1/4 cup dark molasses
3 tablespoons dark rum, or 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
1/2 cup packed dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon salt

PREPARATION
To prepare crust: Stir all-purpose flour, whole-wheat flour, sugar and salt in a medium bowl. Melt butter in a small saucepan over low heat. Cook, swirling the pan, until the butter turns a nutty brown, 30 seconds to 4 minutes, depending on your stove. Pour into a small bowl and let cool. Stir in oil. Slowly stir the butter-oil mixture into the flour mixture with a fork until the mixture is crumbly. Gradually stir in enough ice water so the dough holds together. Press the dough into a flattened disk.
Place two overlapping lengths of plastic wrap on a work surface. Set the dough in the center and cover with two more sheets of plastic wrap. Roll the dough into a 13-inch circle. Remove the top sheets and invert the dough into a 9-inch deep-dish pie pan. Remove the remaining wrap. Fold the edges under at the rim and crimp. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and refrigerate while you prepare the filling.

To prepare filling & bake pie: Position rack in lower third of oven; preheat to 350°F. Lightly whisk eggs in a medium bowl. Add pumpkin, evaporated milk, molasses and rum (or vanilla). Combine brown sugar, cornstarch, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and salt in a small bowl. Rub through a sieve into the pumpkin mixture and whisk until incorporated.

Pour the filling into the prepared crust. Bake the pie until the filling has set and a skewer inserted in the center comes out clean, 40 to 50 minutes; cover the edges with foil if they are browning too quickly. Cool on a wire rack.

Grapeseed oil, a by-product of the wine-making process, comes from extracting the oil from within the small, hard-shelled seed. A stable cooking oil, grapeseed oil does not smoke or splatter. This oil features a high smoke point, or temperature at which oil smokes and discolors, ranging from approximately 320 to 428 degrees, depending on the brand. The light, buttery or nutty flavor leaves no aftertaste and enhances a food’s natural flavor. Grapeseed oil is an economical cooking oil because only one-third to one-half cup of grapeseed oil equals one cup of other oils.

Instructions

Frying, Roasting and Barbecuing

1 Use a paper towel to remove moisture from surface of raw meats. This dry surface will aid in browning the meat.

2 Marinate or brush meat with grapeseed oil or flavored varieties such as garlic or walnut. Grapeseed oil works well with meat, poultry or fish. This thin layer of oil will help retain flavor and prevent sticking to the frying pan, roasting pan or grill.

3 Place meat in pre-heated frying pan, oven or grill. If meat starts to look dry, brush on another thin layer of grapeseed oil.

Grapeseed Oil as a Butter Substitute

4 Substitute grapeseed oil for butter by brushing on a sliced piece of bread. Add optional grated cheese, sliced tomatoes, chopped olives or other toppings.

5 Place topped bread on a shallow metal baking pan under a pre-heated broiler until cheese is melted or toppings are browned.

6 Remove bread carefully from oven. Add freshly ground pepper if desired.

Grapeseed Oil as a Condiment

7 Mix grapeseed oil or varieties infused with herbs and spices as part of a mayonnaise or salad dressing recipe. Test with small amounts of grapeseed oil and increase the amounts to balance with other ingredients in the adapted recipe.

8 Add grapeseed oil to raw or cooked vegetables, salads and pasta. This light-tasting oil will not overpower food.

9 Use grapeseed oil as part of a dip for fresh vegetables on a platter.

Read more: http://www.ehow.com/how_7463732_cook-grapeseed-oil.html#ixzz2iSllh2Wr

Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Crispy Capers and Carrots

Prep: 15 minutes; Cook: 18 minutes. People typically turn up their noses at Brussels sprouts. But carrots, capers, and parsley take these to another level, flavorwise.

Yield: Makes about 12 servings (serving size: 1/2 cup)

Ingredients

2 pounds Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
1 1/2 cups (1/4-inch) diagonally cut carrots
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided
Cooking spray
1 tablespoon butter
1/2 cup well-drained capers
1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 450º.

2. Combine Brussels sprouts, carrots, and 3 tablespoons oil in a medium bowl, tossing to coat. Spread on large roasting pan coated with cooking spray. Bake at 450° for 15 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally.

3. Heat remaining 1 tablespoon oil and butter in a small skillet over medium heat. Add capers; fry 3 minutes or until brown and crisp. With slotted spoon, transfer capers to paper towels to drain. Set aside.

4. Combine Brussels sprout mixture and capers in medium bowl. Sprinkle with parsley, salt, and pepper; toss gently to mix.

Here is a great and easy way to make sweet potato pancakes this is a healthy breakfast, lunch, or snack. Enjoy! See all of my videos at http://livingwell-nutrition.com/certified-nutrition/nutrition-videos/

The weather is getting cooler, but your produce choices are heating up.

These amazing superfoods are either hitting their peak in the garden or can easily be found in your local farmers market or grocery store.

They’re the perfect excuse to get cooking on cool nights!

For more videos visit http://livingwell-nutrition.com/certified-nutrition/nutrition-videos/

I am going to show you how to use and eat Zucchini in a way that is easy and fun! Check out these other videos for more great tips!

Soup – it’s the easiest way to warm up your kitchen on a cold day, and to feed yourself and your family in one delicious and healthy bowl. Some of our favorite vegan and vegetarian soup recipes tend to follow a pattern that can be easily adapted for any vegetable. Here are a few tips we found on how to make soup from almost any vegetable and we wanted to share!

Here’s what you need: vegetables, butter or olive oil, salt and pepper, and some stock and wine. That’s it. Read on for a method to make easy soup out of almost anything.

1. Nearly any vegetable will do – sweet potato, zucchini, squash, turnip, tomato, celery, mushrooms, onions, or leeks. Cut about a pound of vegetables into a medium dice – about an inch across – or smaller if you’re using a dense vegetable, like potato.

2. Sauté the vegetables in a little olive oil or butter, keeping the heat to low and letting the veggie really cook and develop flavor. When not using an aromatic vegetable like leeks, we like to add some onion or garlic as well to develop the flavor.

3. After the vegetables have softened and developed some fragrance and flavor, add about 4 cups of stock and a little wine, cover and simmer. (Even water will do, in a pinch!)

4. Simmer for about an hour or until all the vegetables are soft. Puree the soup in a blender or with an immersion blender. Voilà! You have creamy, easy vegetable soup.

More ideas: Dump in that last handful of pasta you need to use up. Add a few crumbles of ground turkey or beef. Lay cooked strips of chicken breast on top of each bowl. You can also add a little bacon for flavor near the beginning, or you can leave the chunks of vegetables whole. Put in a cup of rice and simmer until done. Use up whatever you have around, but remember that you can still make a very good soup with just a pound or two of leftover vegetables.

 

The weather is getting cooler, but your produce choices are heating up.

These amazing superfoods are either hitting their peak in the garden or can easily be found in your local farmers market or grocery store.

They’re the perfect excuse to get cooking on cool nights!

 

Apples

Sweet or tart, apples are satisfying eaten raw or baked into a delicious dish. Just be sure to eat the skin—it contains hearty-healthy flavonoids. Health benefits include:

• Full of antioxidants
• 4 grams of dietary fiber per serving

Harvest season: August–November

 

Brussels sprouts

Made the correct way, these veggies taste divine. They have a mild, somewhat bitter taste, so combine them with tangy or savory sauces, like balsamic vinegar. Health benefits include:

• 1/2 cup contains more than your DRI of vitamin K
• Very good source of folate
• Good source of iron

Harvest season: September–March

 

Parsnips

Though these veggies may resemble carrots, they have a lighter color and sweeter, almost nutty flavor. Use them to flavor rice and potatoes or puree them into soups and sauces. Health benefits include:

• Rich in potassium
• Good source of fiber

Harvest season: October–April

 

Pears

The sweet and juicy taste makes this fruit a crowd-pleaser. Cooking can really bring out their fabulous flavor, so try them baked or poached. Health benefits include:

• Good source of vitamin C and copper
• 4 grams of fiber per serving

Harvest season: August–February

 

Rutabaga

A cross between a turnip and a cabbage, rutabagas are a popular Swedish dish. To utilize their earthy flavor, add them to casseroles, puree them with turnips and carrots to make a sweet soup, or roast them with ginger, honey, or lemon. Health benefits include:

• Good source of fiber
• Good source of vitamin C

Harvest season: October–April

 

Cauliflower

The sweet, slightly nutty flavor of cauliflower is perfect for winter side dishes. It’s wonderful steamed, but it can also be blended to create a mashed potato-like texture or pureed into soup. Health benefits include:

• Compounds that may help to prevent cancer
• Phytonutrients may lower cholesterol” “Excellent source of vitamin C

Harvest season: September–June

 

Squash

Unlike summer squash, winter squash has a fine texture and a slightly sweet flavor. Because of its thick skin, it can be stored for months. It tastes best with other fall flavorings, like cinnamon and ginger. Health benefits include:

• Contains omega-3 fatty acids
• Excellent source of vitamin A

Harvest season: October–February

 

Pumpkin

A type of winter squash, pumpkin can be used for much more than jack-o’-lanterns. Its sweet taste and moist texture make it ideal for pies, cakes, and even pudding! Health benefits include:

• Rich in potassium
• More than 20% of your DRI of fiber
• Good source of B vitamins

Harvest season: October–February

 

Sweet potatoes

These veggies are for much more than Thanksgiving casseroles. More nutritionally dense than their white-potato counterparts, try roasting them—they’ll taste delicious, and you may maintain more vitamins than boiling. Health benefits include:

• Excellent source of vitamin A
• Good source of iron
• Anti-inflammatory benefits

Harvest season: September–December

 

Turnips

Tender and mild, these root vegetables are a great alternative to radishes and cabbage. To flavor these veggies, use fennel, bread crumbs, or even brown sugar. Turnip leaves, which taste like mustard leaves, are easy to cook and dense in nutrients. Health benefits include:

• The roots are a good source of vitamin C
• Turnip leaves are an excellent source of vitamins A, K, and folate

Harvest season: September–April

 

Pomegranates

This slightly sour fruit has gotten a lot of press as an antioxidant powerhouse. The juice provides a tangy base for marinades, and the seeds can be tossed into salads to amp up the flavor. Health benefits include:

• A UCLA study showed pomegranate juice has higher antioxidant levels than red wine
• Good source of vitamin C and folate

Harvest season: August–December

 

Dates

This Middle Eastern favorite is a sweet fruit that is perfect braised in stews, chopped up in desserts, or stuffed with cream cheese or almonds. Health benefits include:

• Low in fat
• Good source of fiber
• Good source of potassium

Harvest season: September–December

 

Kiwi

Use this sweet fruit to add a tropical flavor to your recipes. It’s great mixed with strawberries, cantaloupe, or oranges and can be combined with pineapple to make a tangy chutney. Health benefits include:

• More vitamin C than an orange
• Good source of potassium and copper

Harvest season: September–March

 

Grapefruit

The signature tartness of grapefruit provides a contrast to other citrus fruit. Add it to mixed greens, combine it with avocado and shrimp, or enjoy a fresh glass of its antioxidant-rich juice. Health benefits include:

• More than 75% of your daily recommended intake (DRI) of vitamin C
• Good source of lycopene
• Contains pectin, which has been shown to lower cholesterol

Harvest season: September–April

 

Tangerines

The small and sweet citrus fruits are positively refreshing for fall recipes. Our favorite flavor combos include almonds, dates, and honey. Juice them with oil, vinegar, and ginger for a to-die-for dressing. Health benefits include:

• Good source of vitamin C
• Good source of beta-carotene

Harvest season: November–April