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If you enjoy chowing down on a bacon sandwich, this article might just lure you into going vegan.

Today, more and more people turn vegetarian every day. If in case you’re wondering why, we have compiled some shocking facts that might make you reconsider living green.

Shocking Facts That Could Make You Go Vegan

Vegans live longer

A group of researchers from Lona Linda University conducted a study and followed 7,000 men and women in a span of 6 years. In the said study, they have discovered that people who follow a meat-free diet are more likely to live longer. Mortality rate is also lower.

In a more recent study, researchers from the University of Oxford revealed that the risk of death or hospitalization due to heart diseases is 32% lower in vegans as compared to their meat-eating counterparts.

Save animals

150 billion animals are killed every year just to keep up with the demand of consumers. And yes, we mean billions!

A slaughterhouse kills an average of 1,100 pigs per hour. Considering the volume, this means that most of the pigs that enter the scalding tank are not properly stunned. Hence, most of them are boiled while they are fully conscious. Meanwhile, 200 million baby chicks are ground alive each year in egg factories worldwide.

Meats aren’t as fresh as you thought

When buying steak at the grocery, most of you would choose the nice-looking reddish meat because it looks fresh. But what consumers fail to realize is that the meat is treated with carbon monoxide to keep it from turning color.

Solves world hunger

Despite producing enough corn and grain to feed everyone in the world, more than 925,000,000 people from all over the world don’t have food to eat. This is because most of the corn and grain are used to feed livestock.

Additionally, an acre of land used to raise cattles can produce 20 pounds of edible meat; whereas, if soybeans were grown instead, that same acre would yield 356 pounds of protein – nearly 17 times as much.

 

 

Living Well_9.9

You’re on the road and it hits you, and it’s not the need for a bathroom break or driver fatigue. We’re talking about the hunger pangs and the need for a snack. In this case, you have no choice but to stop at a convenience store and grab a bag of chips and an energy drink.

Your limited food choices can make it pretty tough to make good food choices. All it takes is a little planning and you can easily avoid convenience store staples that contain simple sugars and empty calories.

When it comes to snack selection, we recommend choosing something that would keep you full longer. This will keep your energy up and your belt-size intact. Check out our list of snacks that will keep you energized during your trip.

Fruits

Fruits are considered to be one of the best on-the-go snack options out there. Grapes and berries are snack-sized and finger-friendly, making it a great snack option during a road trip.

To help keep them cool and fresh, store your fruits in lidded food containers and inside an insulated cooler.

Nuts

If you are craving for something salty and crunchy, skip the chips and pop open a container of nuts. Though nuts are loaded with healthy fats, fiber and protein, it is best to keep portions small. Also, choose unsalted varieties to keep your sodium levels in check.

Energy bars

To boost your protein and fiber intake while avoiding the sugar trap, you might want to consider replacing your favorite candy bar with a granola bar. Mind you, not all granola bars are created equal. Be sure to read the labels carefully so as to ensure that you are not trading a sugar-laden bar with another.

Healthy beverages

While a can of soda may seem like the perfect beverage to get you through your drive, it contains high levels of refined sugar.

Water, sports drinks and fruit juices are more healthy alternatives to soda. Keep a few bottles chilling in the cooler while you drive.

 

 

 

Surprising Salad Facts

Most people think that salads are a safe choice since the main ingredients of this dish are nutritious and low-calorie veggies. Your greens might be healthy, but once you add a bottle of store-bought dressing into the equation, everything seems to change.

We’ve discovered a few surprising salad facts that we’d like to share with you. Next time you prepare a salad, be cautious on what you’re using to top off that salad.

It’s loaded with untested “Franken” ingredients

If you are to check the labels of some of the most popular salad dressing in the market, you’ll then realize that oil is one of the top ingredients.

Unfortunately, the oils that are used in non-organic salad dressings are from genetically engineered canola or soy. This is quite disturbing as these crops are grown using large amounts of pesticides. So, next time you’re buying a salad dressing, opt for organic ones.

Popular salad dressing has high fructose content

Studies revealed that consuming a high amount of fructose in as little as 6 weeks can make you less smart. You might be surprised to know that high-fructose corn syrup can be found in many salad dressings, including the popular ones.

Beware of salad dressings with too much regular sugar. Most fruit-based dressings like raspberry vinaigrette contain massive amounts of sweeteners.

Iceberg lettuce

A lot of pre-made salads are made with tons of iceberg lettuce. Mind you, they offer very few nutrients and aren’t that tasty either. For an extra good-for-me punch, you might want to use darker leafy greens like romaine, arugula and spinach.

Salad dressings contain Titanium Oxide

Titanium oxide is a go-to substance in the paint industry as it makes the color fresher and brighter. Unfortunately, this substance is also present in most salad dressings. To make matters worse, this substance is often contaminated with lead. We bet you don’t want that on your plate.

Make sure to check the label before buying. In most cases, Titanium oxide itself is listed as an ingredient, but sometimes it’s listed under some vague terms.

They’re also loaded with trans fats

Your taste buds may love them, but your body hates it. This is because it tends to promote heart diseases. Trans fats are present in salad dressings since they are used to extend the shelf life of the said product.

Trans fats should be listed under nutrition facts, but some manufacturers are trying to conceal. Ingredient listings like shortening or partially hydrogenated are some of the things you should look out for.

Experts believe that the key to a healthy diet is taking in a wide variety of foods but
taking into account the number of calories per serving.
Listed below are a few helpful tips that would help you maintain a healthy diet by
adhering to this principle while allowing you to enjoy your favorite foods.
Eat fruits, vegetables and whole grains

Survey reveals that most Americans don’t get to eat as much of these foods. If you
are taking in 6-11 servings of pasta, cereal, rice and bread group, then at least 3
servings of which should be whole grains.
Also, you should eat at least 2-4 servings of fruits and vegetables. If you don’t like
them that much, give them another chance. Try to browse through the internet for
simple yet healthy recipes.

Eat a variety of nutritious foods
In order to maintain good health, our bodies need at least 40 different nutrients.
And you can’t get all those nutrients in a single food group. Your food selection
should include meat, fruits and vegetables, whole grain products and dairy
products. Also, a person’s food intake depends on his caloric needs.

Maintain a healthy weight
A person’s ideal weight depends on a number of factors including age, height and
sex. Excess fat could increase your chances of developing diabetes, stroke, heart
disease, high blood pressure and some forms of cancer.
Being too thin, on the other hand, could increase your risk of menstrual
irregularities, osteoporosis and other diseases. Adhering to an exercise program can
also help you maintain a healthy weight.

Reduce food intake
If your favorite food is high in fat, salt or sugar, then eliminating it from your diet is
not the solution. Rather, you have to control how much you take in and how often
you eat these foods.
If fried chicken is one of your favorites, you are still free to enjoy it. You just have to
eat it less often.

Make gradual changes
You are not expected to magically change your eating habits overnight. People who
try to change their diet significantly are less likely to succeed. Most of the time,
these people would go back to their old eating habits within a few weeks.

Indulging on classic dishes like pumpkin pie, hot chocolate, mashed potato and prime ribs is a part of the holiday fun. However, taking in too much of these could make you feel heavy and bloated. Luckily, there are a few healthy tweaks that you could do in order to help lighten up your favorite holiday treats without sacrificing the taste and your figure as well.

Cheese tray

When serving cheese, try to incorporate reduced-fat cheeses to your usual cheese selection. This way, health-conscious individuals shall have better options. Also, don’t forget to round up your cheese tray with whole grain crackers and fresh fruits like pears, apples, figs and grapes.

Mashed potato makeover

Though potatoes by themselves offer a long list of nutrients like Vitamin C and potassium, you’ll be sacrificing its nutritional integrity by adding in loads of fattening ingredients like heavy cream, butter and whole milk.

To lighten up this tasty treat, use low fat buttermilk instead of full-fat dairy. Plus, ramp up the flavor by adding in spices and fresh herbs like roasted garlic or chipotle pepper.

Slim with skim

During the Christmas season, it’s fine to indulge on peppermint lattes and hot chocolate. However, considering the amount of food you’ll be taking in, it is best to trim down on the calories where you can. So, instead of whole milk, request for skimmed milk. By doing so, you could save up to 100 calories per 16 ounce serving.

Cut the crust

If you’re the type of person who eats pumpkin pie just for the filling, you might want to skip on the crust completely. By doing so, you could shave off at least 100 calories per slice.

Stick to your usual filling recipe and pour it into individual ramekins. Then, bake it until it sets. Top it off with whipped cream and you’ll get a delicious pumpkin custard with a cute presentation to match.

Rethink your roast

For meat lovers, a holiday celebration would never be complete without a perfectly cooked slab of prime rib. However, at 720 calories per 6 ounce slice, the stats alone could make your heart skip a beat.

For an equally tasty meal without all the damage, you might want to consider lean beef tenderloin since it has about half of the calories. If this does not work you, you could also try other lean holiday entrees like pork tenderloin or roast turkey.

 

Healthy eating is not about depriving yourself from the food you love or maintaining a slim figure. It’s about staying as healthy as possible and feeling great about it. Fortunately, this could all be attained by sticking to some nutritional basics and applying them to your daily diet.

In this article, we’ll help you plan and create healthy and tasty meals and expand your range of healthy and delectable food choices. Read on and enjoy the perks of sticking to a healthier eating habit.

Simplify

Instead of obsessing yourselves over calorie counts and measuring food sizes, think of your diet in terms of freshness, variety and color. By doing this, it would be easier for you choose a variety of healthy foods without the complications of counting calories and serving sizes. Focus on the foods you love, create easy recipes and incorporate fresh ingredients.

Make gradual changes

Shifting to a healthier diet cannot be done overnight. That’s not realistic either. Also, a person who tries to change everything at once tends to cheat or easily give up on their new diet plan.

Take small steps such as adding a vegetable or fruit to your diet once in a while. Also, when cooking, you could switch from butter to olive oil. As you start to adapt to these changes, feel free to add in more healthy foods into your diet.

Incorporate exercise and water in your diet

Water helps flush out toxins and waste products in our system. With the lack of water in our body, this could result to dehydration; thus, causing headache, lack of energy and tiredness. Staying hydrated is important.

Most people mistake thirst for hunger. Drink a glass of water to know if you are really hunger or you’re just thirsty. This could also be helpful for people who are on a diet.

Find an activity that you enjoy and add it to your daily routine, just like adding in a few fruits and vegetables in your diet every day. Exercise comes with a long list of benefits. And you can get all these by staying active and spending a few minutes a day exercising.

By adhering to a regular exercise program, plus, incorporating a few servings of healthy foods, you are on your way to a healthier lifestyle.

Grapeseed oil, a by-product of the wine-making process, comes from extracting the oil from within the small, hard-shelled seed. A stable cooking oil, grapeseed oil does not smoke or splatter. This oil features a high smoke point, or temperature at which oil smokes and discolors, ranging from approximately 320 to 428 degrees, depending on the brand. The light, buttery or nutty flavor leaves no aftertaste and enhances a food’s natural flavor. Grapeseed oil is an economical cooking oil because only one-third to one-half cup of grapeseed oil equals one cup of other oils.

Instructions

Frying, Roasting and Barbecuing

1 Use a paper towel to remove moisture from surface of raw meats. This dry surface will aid in browning the meat.

2 Marinate or brush meat with grapeseed oil or flavored varieties such as garlic or walnut. Grapeseed oil works well with meat, poultry or fish. This thin layer of oil will help retain flavor and prevent sticking to the frying pan, roasting pan or grill.

3 Place meat in pre-heated frying pan, oven or grill. If meat starts to look dry, brush on another thin layer of grapeseed oil.

Grapeseed Oil as a Butter Substitute

4 Substitute grapeseed oil for butter by brushing on a sliced piece of bread. Add optional grated cheese, sliced tomatoes, chopped olives or other toppings.

5 Place topped bread on a shallow metal baking pan under a pre-heated broiler until cheese is melted or toppings are browned.

6 Remove bread carefully from oven. Add freshly ground pepper if desired.

Grapeseed Oil as a Condiment

7 Mix grapeseed oil or varieties infused with herbs and spices as part of a mayonnaise or salad dressing recipe. Test with small amounts of grapeseed oil and increase the amounts to balance with other ingredients in the adapted recipe.

8 Add grapeseed oil to raw or cooked vegetables, salads and pasta. This light-tasting oil will not overpower food.

9 Use grapeseed oil as part of a dip for fresh vegetables on a platter.

Read more: http://www.ehow.com/how_7463732_cook-grapeseed-oil.html#ixzz2iSllh2Wr

Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Crispy Capers and Carrots

Prep: 15 minutes; Cook: 18 minutes. People typically turn up their noses at Brussels sprouts. But carrots, capers, and parsley take these to another level, flavorwise.

Yield: Makes about 12 servings (serving size: 1/2 cup)

Ingredients

2 pounds Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
1 1/2 cups (1/4-inch) diagonally cut carrots
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided
Cooking spray
1 tablespoon butter
1/2 cup well-drained capers
1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 450º.

2. Combine Brussels sprouts, carrots, and 3 tablespoons oil in a medium bowl, tossing to coat. Spread on large roasting pan coated with cooking spray. Bake at 450° for 15 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally.

3. Heat remaining 1 tablespoon oil and butter in a small skillet over medium heat. Add capers; fry 3 minutes or until brown and crisp. With slotted spoon, transfer capers to paper towels to drain. Set aside.

4. Combine Brussels sprout mixture and capers in medium bowl. Sprinkle with parsley, salt, and pepper; toss gently to mix.

Here is a great and easy way to make sweet potato pancakes this is a healthy breakfast, lunch, or snack. Enjoy! See all of my videos at http://livingwell-nutrition.com/certified-nutrition/nutrition-videos/

The weather is getting cooler, but your produce choices are heating up.

These amazing superfoods are either hitting their peak in the garden or can easily be found in your local farmers market or grocery store.

They’re the perfect excuse to get cooking on cool nights!

 

Apples

Sweet or tart, apples are satisfying eaten raw or baked into a delicious dish. Just be sure to eat the skin—it contains hearty-healthy flavonoids. Health benefits include:

• Full of antioxidants
• 4 grams of dietary fiber per serving

Harvest season: August–November

 

Brussels sprouts

Made the correct way, these veggies taste divine. They have a mild, somewhat bitter taste, so combine them with tangy or savory sauces, like balsamic vinegar. Health benefits include:

• 1/2 cup contains more than your DRI of vitamin K
• Very good source of folate
• Good source of iron

Harvest season: September–March

 

Parsnips

Though these veggies may resemble carrots, they have a lighter color and sweeter, almost nutty flavor. Use them to flavor rice and potatoes or puree them into soups and sauces. Health benefits include:

• Rich in potassium
• Good source of fiber

Harvest season: October–April

 

Pears

The sweet and juicy taste makes this fruit a crowd-pleaser. Cooking can really bring out their fabulous flavor, so try them baked or poached. Health benefits include:

• Good source of vitamin C and copper
• 4 grams of fiber per serving

Harvest season: August–February

 

Rutabaga

A cross between a turnip and a cabbage, rutabagas are a popular Swedish dish. To utilize their earthy flavor, add them to casseroles, puree them with turnips and carrots to make a sweet soup, or roast them with ginger, honey, or lemon. Health benefits include:

• Good source of fiber
• Good source of vitamin C

Harvest season: October–April

 

Cauliflower

The sweet, slightly nutty flavor of cauliflower is perfect for winter side dishes. It’s wonderful steamed, but it can also be blended to create a mashed potato-like texture or pureed into soup. Health benefits include:

• Compounds that may help to prevent cancer
• Phytonutrients may lower cholesterol” “Excellent source of vitamin C

Harvest season: September–June

 

Squash

Unlike summer squash, winter squash has a fine texture and a slightly sweet flavor. Because of its thick skin, it can be stored for months. It tastes best with other fall flavorings, like cinnamon and ginger. Health benefits include:

• Contains omega-3 fatty acids
• Excellent source of vitamin A

Harvest season: October–February

 

Pumpkin

A type of winter squash, pumpkin can be used for much more than jack-o’-lanterns. Its sweet taste and moist texture make it ideal for pies, cakes, and even pudding! Health benefits include:

• Rich in potassium
• More than 20% of your DRI of fiber
• Good source of B vitamins

Harvest season: October–February

 

Sweet potatoes

These veggies are for much more than Thanksgiving casseroles. More nutritionally dense than their white-potato counterparts, try roasting them—they’ll taste delicious, and you may maintain more vitamins than boiling. Health benefits include:

• Excellent source of vitamin A
• Good source of iron
• Anti-inflammatory benefits

Harvest season: September–December

 

Turnips

Tender and mild, these root vegetables are a great alternative to radishes and cabbage. To flavor these veggies, use fennel, bread crumbs, or even brown sugar. Turnip leaves, which taste like mustard leaves, are easy to cook and dense in nutrients. Health benefits include:

• The roots are a good source of vitamin C
• Turnip leaves are an excellent source of vitamins A, K, and folate

Harvest season: September–April

 

Pomegranates

This slightly sour fruit has gotten a lot of press as an antioxidant powerhouse. The juice provides a tangy base for marinades, and the seeds can be tossed into salads to amp up the flavor. Health benefits include:

• A UCLA study showed pomegranate juice has higher antioxidant levels than red wine
• Good source of vitamin C and folate

Harvest season: August–December

 

Dates

This Middle Eastern favorite is a sweet fruit that is perfect braised in stews, chopped up in desserts, or stuffed with cream cheese or almonds. Health benefits include:

• Low in fat
• Good source of fiber
• Good source of potassium

Harvest season: September–December

 

Kiwi

Use this sweet fruit to add a tropical flavor to your recipes. It’s great mixed with strawberries, cantaloupe, or oranges and can be combined with pineapple to make a tangy chutney. Health benefits include:

• More vitamin C than an orange
• Good source of potassium and copper

Harvest season: September–March

 

Grapefruit

The signature tartness of grapefruit provides a contrast to other citrus fruit. Add it to mixed greens, combine it with avocado and shrimp, or enjoy a fresh glass of its antioxidant-rich juice. Health benefits include:

• More than 75% of your daily recommended intake (DRI) of vitamin C
• Good source of lycopene
• Contains pectin, which has been shown to lower cholesterol

Harvest season: September–April

 

Tangerines

The small and sweet citrus fruits are positively refreshing for fall recipes. Our favorite flavor combos include almonds, dates, and honey. Juice them with oil, vinegar, and ginger for a to-die-for dressing. Health benefits include:

• Good source of vitamin C
• Good source of beta-carotene

Harvest season: November–April