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Why Am I So Tired? 3 Possible Causes of Fatigue

Do you feel tired all the time? Lots of people do. It’s a sign of our overbooked times.

Getting your energy back could be simpler than you think. Start by seeing if you can relate to the top three reasons for feeling drained.

The most common reasons for feeling tired are about daily habits.

1. What you eat. Reaching for caffeine and sugar can backfire, leaving you more fatigued as your blood sugar levels fluctuate wildly. Instead, go for a balanced, healthy diet replete with fruits, vegetables, and lean protein. “Most people feel like they’re less tired if they eat a healthy diet,” says J. Fred Ralston Jr., MD, past president of the American College of Physicians. “Eating healthy also means you’ll carry less weight, and obesity is a big contributor to fatigue.

2. How much you sleep. You saw this one coming, right? Many people don’t get enough sleep. If you’re one of them, avoid caffeine and alcohol in the hours just before bedtime, turn off the TV before bed, and keep your bedroom quiet and restful.

3. How much you exercise. This is the biggie, Ralston says. His favorite prescription for plain old tiredness is regular, vigorous exercise. Finish at least three hours before bedtime, so you have time to wind down.

If you think that exercise would just make you more tired, there’s good news: Exercise breeds energy. Almost all the studies that have looked at this question have found the same thing: Sedentary people who start exercising feel much less fatigue than those who stay idle. It’s one of those surprising truths: move more and you’ll get more energy.

Ralston recommends getting 40 minutes of exercise at least four days a week, to get you going.

Do that, and a month from now, you should notice some improvement. Keep with it for three to six months more, and you should feel much better.

If you follow your exercise prescription for at least a month — and you’re also making enough time for sleep — and you’re still feeling lousy, look into other causes, Ralston advises.

Source: http://women.webmd.com/guide/why-so-tired-10-causes-fatigue

Eat This, Not That: Healthy Summer Snack IdeasIt’s easy to overindulge and gain weight during the summer months. Avoid undoing all of your hard work spent getting your body ready for warmer weather by enjoying lighter versions of your favorite summertime snacks. These great-tasting alternatives are just as delicious, and will help maintain your waistline.

 

Enjoy This: Pop Chips

Not This: Stacy’s Pita Chips

 

Pop Chips: Serving Size: 23 chips, 120 calories, 4 grams of fat, 0 grams of saturated fat, 18 grams of carbs, 1 gram of fiber, 2 grams of protein, 190 milligrams of sodium

Stacy’s Pita Chips: Serving size: 14 chips, 130 calories, 5 grams of fat, 0.5 grams of saturated fat, 19 grams of carbs, 2 grams of fiber, 3 grams of protein, 140 milligrams of sodium

Enjoy This: Skinny Cow Fudge Bar

Not This: Häagen-Dazs Coffee Low Fat Frozen Yogurt

 

Skinny Cow: Serving Size: 1 bar, 100 calories, 1 gram of fat, 0.5 grams of saturated fat, 22 grams of carbs, 4 grams of fiber, 4 grams of protein, 45 milligrams of sodium

Häagen-Dazs: Serving Size: 1/2 cup, 200 calories, 4.5 grams of fat, 2.5 grams of saturated fat, 31 grams of carbs, 0 grams of fiber, 8 grams of protein, 50 milligrams of sodium

Enjoy This: Tostitos Salsa

Not This: Sabra Hummus

 

Tostitos Salsa: Serving Size: 2 tablespoons, 10 calories, 0 grams of fat, 0 grams of saturated fat, 3 grams of carbs. 0.5 grams of fiber, 0.5 grams of protein, 210 milligrams of sodium

Sabra Hummus: Serving Size: 2 tablespoons, 70 calories, 6 grams of fat, 1 gram of saturated fat, 4 grams of carbs, 1 gram of fiber, 2 grams of protein, 120 milligrams of sodium

Enjoy This: F-Factor Banana Walnut Bar

Not This: Clif Bar Banana Nut Bread

 

F-Factor Banana Walnut Bar: Serving Size: 1 bar, 160 calories, 5 grams of fat, 0.5 grams of saturated fat, 26 grams of carbs, 12 grams of fiber, 3 grams of protein, 25 milligrams of sodium

Clif Bar Banana Nut Bread: Serving Size: 1 bar, 240 calories, 6 grams of fat, 1 gram of saturated fat, 42 grams of carbs, 4 grams of fiber, 9 grams of protein, 180 milligrams of sodium

 

Article Consulted http://magazine.foxnews.com/food-wellness/healthy-summer-snack-alternatives#ixzz2Xz9kixJw

 


Summer BBQ Tips

Keep Your Salad HealthyIs your salad as healthy as you think it is?  Salads are great. They are light, fresh, and available everywhere. Add chicken, fish, or shrimp and your salad becomes a complete and filling entrée. And you can throw in everything from fruits to vegetables to nuts; you can hit every food group. But don’t be fooled. Your salad may not always be the best thing for you and that is largely because of the dressing. Store bought salad dressings can be incredibly deceiving. If you are going to stick with store bought salad dressing, make a point to read through the ingredients. Is real olive oil being used? Do your research so you know what you are putting in your body.  Restaurant salads can also be incredibly deceiving – and it all comes back to the dressing. Stay away from creamy dressings at restaurants. Instead, ask for olive oil and vinegar. You can even squeeze a few lemon slices over your salad to spice it up. Or go with vinaigrette, as most are on the lighter side when it comes to dressings. Restaurants tend to soak your salad in dressing. This is often not necessary – ask for light dressing, or order on the side and dress the salad yourself. This way you are controlling your portions, and if you need to add a little more to up the salad’s taste, you can do so by your own wishes.

 

Now the best option would be to consider making your own salad dressings. Not only will it be cheaper, and fresher, but you will also know exactly what you are putting into your body. You can make dressings at home and store them as you would store bought dressings.  Asian or honey mustard dressings are relatively easy to put together, so look up a few recipes online. You can also research healthy alternatives to your favorite restaurant dressings. The goal should be to keep your salad healthy, and know what you are putting into your body!

You have probably heard it your whole life: “breakfast is the most important meal of the day”.  Most breakfast and cereal companies advertise that breakfast is the most important meal because without a big, healthy, breakfast you won’t have enough energy to get through the day.  The actual reason breakfast is the most important is because it sets the stage for your entire day of eating. So if you eat an unhealthy or sugary breakfast, you are much more likely to crave foods that are high in fat and sugars for the rest of the day.

When you eat breakfast are you actually hungry? People often eat breakfast as part of their morning routine. They are used to eating breakfast immediately after they wake up. Next time, take a second to see if you are actually hungry. There is nothing wrong with waiting an hour or two after waking up to eat breakfast – when you are actually hungry. By waiting a few extra hours, you are giving your body a chance to clean itself out and actually digest whatever was in your stomach from the day before.

Whatever your breakfast routine is, consider making fruit part of your breakfast habits. Fruit is packed with vitamins, minerals, water, and fiber (and these are all very beneficial things to start your day with). The fiber will help to keep you longer and consuming fruit in the morning can help you meet the recommended five fruit and vegetable servings.  If your mornings are busy, fruit is great to eat on the go. Or, if you have the time make a fruit smoothie or add berries to yogurt and granola.

How You Should Be Cooking Your VegetablesFirst off, it is great that you are eating vegetables! There is a right way to cook vegetables to get the maximum health benefits. When you are in the kitchen, keep these simple rules in mind.

Water and oil should be avoided as much as possible. Boiling vegetables in water will make your vegetables nice and soft – but it also has a tendency to reduce the nutrient value. So unless you are drinking the water you used to boil the veggies in, you are missing out on several health benefits! Using oil to sauté your vegetables can be very tasty, but the oil saturation is not very healthy.

Consider steaming your vegetables, this is a much healthier alternative to boiling. If you steam your vegetables, you are not loosing nutrients to water. Additionally, steaming them also retains the natural flavor of the vegetable. If you are looking for some added flavor, consider adding seasonings like garlic and salt or sesame seeds. Try to avoid adding salt to your vegetables. Although salt can bring out the taste in vegetables, it should not be your main flavor – adding other seasonings or tasty spices is often far healthier.

If frying or sautéing vegetables is your go to move, try grilling them instead! Use a super light layer of high heat canola oil. Use the oil to get the vegetables to that perfect crispy brown. Grilled vegetables are delicious and still retain that flavorful taste you get from sautéing.